New Zealand

Discover the best dive centers in New Zealand

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Discover the best dive centers in New Zealand

DIVING NEW ZEALAND

As a tourist destination, New Zealand calls forth pictures of green pastures, witty Hobbits and wicked All-Black rugby players. Well, think again! New Zealand is first and foremost a country turned towards the sea: Auckland is also known as 'The City of Sails', refering to the passion of its inhabitants for sailing. Being out there on the ocean for a fishing contest, spending your weekends on the beach, feeding the whanau ('family' in Maori language) freshly caught crayfish, that's the Kiwi lifestyle! And scuba diving is a much sought-after activity, since the waters around Aotearoa - Maori for 'The Land of the Long White Cloud'- are very rich...

Most New Zealanders are regular divers, though they mostly practise it to 'get a feed'! Fortunately some areas are protected and offer curious divers the show of a lifetime!

On the North Island, the main diving hub is on the north east coast, with the world-class Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve, off the coast of Tutukaka; and the Bay of Islands, where the Rainbow Warrior has been relocated. The Coromandel region, south east of Auckland, has some stunning dive sites, notably around Cathedral Cove. And far off to the north of the Bay of Plenty, lies the active volcano of White Island...

The South Island counts two main diving regions. North, in Marlborough Sounds, a huge Russian cruise liner shipwreck, 'The Lermontov', offers Titanic style diving; South, in the sounds of Fjordland, witness the eerie atmosphere among black coral bushes!

The Poor Knights Marine Reserve is the flagship diving area. There is a tropical influence from Australia's Great Barrier Reef (turtles and manta rays are regular visitors!), and the largest marine biodiversity in the country. Their volcanic origins date back to 10 millions years and geologists say the islands were separated from the mainland some 2 million years ago! Jacques Cousteau ranked the Poor Knights number 7 in the best places he had ever dived, that says it all! Since 1997 they offer not only an incredible biomass, but also caves, arches, swim-throughs, drop-off, kelp prairies and more... In January and February, hundreds of stingrays congregate to mate, which is a truly fantastic show in itself: but when orcas come in to feast on them, then it is an out-of-this-world experience you're onto!

If you include scuba diving in your trip to New Zealand, it is a guarantee of going back home with a memory full of wonders!

More infos at divethefive.co.nz/

DIVING NEW ZEALAND

As a tourist destination, New Zealand calls forth pictures of green pastures, witty Hobbits and wicked All-Black rugby players. Well, think again! New Zealand is first and foremost a country turned towards the sea: Auckland is also known as 'The City of Sails', refering to the passion of its inhabitants for sailing. Being out there on the ocean for a fishing contest, spending your weekends on the beach, feeding the whanau ('family' in Maori language) freshly caught crayfish, that's the Kiwi lifestyle! And scuba diving is a much sought-after activity, since the waters around Aotearoa - Maori for 'The Land of the Long White Cloud'- are very rich...

Most New Zealanders are regular divers, though they mostly practise it to 'get a feed'! Fortunately some areas are protected and offer curious divers the show of a lifetime!

On the North Island, the main diving hub is on the north east coast, with the world-class Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve, off the coast of Tutukaka; and the Bay of Islands, where the Rainbow Warrior has been relocated. The Coromandel region, south east of Auckland, has some stunning dive sites, notably around Cathedral Cove. And far off to the north of the Bay of Plenty, lies the active volcano of White Island...

The South Island counts two main diving regions. North, in Marlborough Sounds, a huge Russian cruise liner shipwreck, 'The Lermontov', offers Titanic style diving; South, in the sounds of Fjordland, witness the eerie atmosphere among black coral bushes!

The Poor Knights Marine Reserve is the flagship diving area. There is a tropical influence from Australia's Great Barrier Reef (turtles and manta rays are regular visitors!), and the largest marine biodiversity in the country. Their volcanic origins date back to 10 millions years and geologists say the islands were separated from the mainland some 2 million years ago! Jacques Cousteau ranked the Poor Knights number 7 in the best places he had ever dived, that says it all! Since 1997 they offer not only an incredible biomass, but also caves, arches, swim-throughs, drop-off, kelp prairies and more... In January and February, hundreds of stingrays congregate to mate, which is a truly fantastic show in itself: but when orcas come in to feast on them, then it is an out-of-this-world experience you're onto!

If you include scuba diving in your trip to New Zealand, it is a guarantee of going back home with a memory full of wonders!

More infos at divethefive.co.nz/

DIVING NEW ZEALAND

As a tourist destination, New Zealand calls forth pictures of green pastures, witty ...

Water and air temperature :
Jan.Feb.Mar.Apr.May.Jun.Jul.Aug.Sep.Oct.Nov.Dec.
Water and air temperatureAir temperature24°26°26°23°19°17°12°12°13°15°17°21°
Water temperature19°20°20°20°18°16°14°14°14°15°16°17°
Water and air temperature :
Water and air temperatureJan.Feb.Mar.Apr.May.Jun.Jul.Aug.Sep.Oct.Nov.Dec.
Air temperature24°26°26°23°19°17°12°12°13°15°17°21°
Water temperature19°20°20°20°18°16°14°14°14°15°16°17°
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